San Lorenzo Creek Watershed Archive



San Lorenzo Creek Watershed Data Base

Watershed, General
Upper Watershed
Middle Watershed
Lower Watershed



WATERSHED, GENERAL

General Characteristics:
San Lorenzo Creek flows generally west, entering central San Francisco Bay near Roberts Landing, west of the city of San Lorenzo. A 4.6 mile concrete channel runs from the mouth upstream.

The watershed consists of about 48 square miles, with highly urbanized lower and middle watershed areas. The upper watershed, including areas tributary to Crow and Palomares creeks, is less urbanized.

Cull Creek Dam, located at RM 8.9 approximately 0.25 miles upstream from the Crow Creek confluence, was constructed in the early 1960s. The dam created a complete barrier to fish migration. Don Castro Dam, located immediately downstream of the Palomares Creek confluence, also was built in the early 1960s and also created a complete barrier to upstream migration. More than 60% of the San Lorenzo Creek watershed is upstream of the Cull Creek and Don Castro reservoirs.

VIDEO: The San Lorenzo Creek Watershed

History:

Maps:

Watershed area (JPG file, 233 kB)

Creek & Watershed Map of Hayward and San Leandro (Oakland Museum, 1996)

"Baylands and Creeks of South San Francisco Bay" (Oakland Museum 2005). A map showing both the historical and modern hydroscapes of the South Bay, including the San Lorenzo Creek watershed.

"Preliminary Map of Historic Margins of Marshland, San Francisco Bay, California." Donald R. Nichols and Nancy A. Wright, U.S. Geological Survey, in coooperation with U.S. Dept. Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D.C., 1971

Images:

Documents:

"Fish Habitat and Fish Population Assessment for the San Lorenzo Creek Watershed, Alameda County, California," Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District and Hagar Environmental Science, 2002.

"Historical Distribution and Current Status of Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss),Coho Salmon (O. kisutch), and Chinook Salmon (O. tshawytscha) in Streams of the San Francisco Estuary, California," Robert A. Leidy, Gordon S. Becker, and Brett N. Harvey, October 2003.



UPPER SAN LORENZO CREEK WATERSHED
(Bolinas, Crow, Cull, Eden, Hollis, Norris, Palomares, and San Lorenzo creeks)

BOLINAS CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Sometimes spelled "Bellinas" on maps.

GNIS identifier: 219604 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Lat. (DEC)Long. (DEC)Lat. (DMS)Long. (DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.7596501-122.0288503374535N1220144WLas Trampas Ridge
Source37.7972222-122.0466667374750N1220248WLas Trampas Ridge

General Characteristics:

• Most remote and pristine of all creeks
• Three square mile basin
• Mostly native riparian corridor
• Flows from Rocky Ridge into Crow Creek

History:

Named for Antonio Bolena, a native of the Azores, who owned land along the creek in the 1870s. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Some overgrazing
• Cattle in portions of the creek
• Channel incision
• Illegal dumping

Maps:

U.S. Geological Survey map "Las Trampas Ridge" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000)

Images:

Documents:



CROW CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Crow Canyon Creek

GNIS identifier: 233742 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Lat. (DEC)Long. (DEC)Lat. (DMS)Long. (DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.6918750-122.0585735374131N1220331WHayward
Source37.7827051 -122.0269058374658N1220137WLas Trampas Ridge

General Characteristics:

• Begins along ridgeline between Alameda and Contra Costa counties, flowing into Cull Creek; the largest tributary to San Lorenzo Creek.
• A perennial stream draining approximately six square mile basin.
• Low water temperatures support fish.
• No dams on this creek.
• A 1,600 foot concrete box culvert was constructed in 1972 upstream of the confluence of Cull Creek with San Lorenzo Creek.

History:

Named for William Granville Crow, a farmer from Missouri, who settled in the canyon in the 1850s. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Overgrazing
• Manure management
• Illegal dumping
• Exotic species

The annual sediment yield of the Crow Creek watershed from 1835 to 2000 was about 24,300 sq. yd. per year. Crow Creek watershed supplies a high proportion of fine sediment partly because its geology is prone to earthflow landslides, but also because of increased erosion rates associated with historical and current land use.

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "Las Trampas Ridge" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Documents:

Stream Survey Crow Creek, J. T. Allen and R. Moore, Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, June 16, 1960.

Initial Report of Fish and Wildlife Loss: Crow Canyon Creek, S. deSilva, Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, July 8, 1975.

L.M. Collins, "Geomorphic Analysis of Land Use Impacts of Crow Creek in Alameda County, California," prepared for Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, 2006 (105 pages, not including appendices).

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for Crow Creek

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for Crow Creek



CULL CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Cull Canyon Creek

GNIS identifier: 221904 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth 37.7015969 -122.0541290374206N1220315WHayward
Source37.8040936 -122.0546846374815N1220317WLas Trampas Ridge

General Characteristics:

• Northernmost subwatershed. The creek flows south in Cull Canyon into Crow Creek.
• Cull Creek Dam was built in 1963 (310 acre-feet capacity) approximately 0.25 miles upstream from the Crow Creek confluence.
• Upper part of subwatershed is primarily grazing land.
• Many horse boarding facilities.
• Good water quality and excellent wildlife habitat

History:

Named for William Slead Cull, a native of Kentucky, who settled in the canyon in the 1850s. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Grazing practices
• Manure management
• Non-native species below dam
• Erosion and sedimentation
• Illegal dumping
• Dam is fish barrier

Cull Creek watershed sediment yield was estimated to be about 27,600 sq. yd. per year in 1980, when the trap efficiency of the Cull Creek Reservoir was about 88%.

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "Las Trampas Ridge" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Cull Canyon Dam spillway (Photo by Anda Chu, BANG, Feb. 5, 2014)

Cull Canyon reservoir (Photo by Anda Chu, BANG, Feb. 5, 2014)

Documents:

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for Cull Creek

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for Cull Creek

Cull Creek Dam: Chronological History

News: Cull Creek Dam May Be Modified to Restore Creek Flow (Feb. 11, 2014)



EDEN CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Eden Canyon Creek

GNIS identifier: 1682694 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.7060411-122.0196833374222N1220111WHayward
Source37.7315955-121.9913490374354N1215929WDublin

General Characteristics:

• Most sinuous creek in the watershed, it flows southwest from Divide Ridge through Eden Canyon into Palomares Creek.
• Good riparian habitat
• Low levels of pollutants
• Cool water

History:
Named after the township in which it is located. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Heavily incised streambed
• Highly erosive hillsides
• Grazing practices (cattle in the creek)
• Culverts at tributaries
• Fish passage blocked at structure beneath I-580 and Don Castro Dam
• Illegal dumping

• Most sinuous creek in the watershed, it flows southwest from Divide Ridge through Eden Canyon into Palomares Creek.
• Good riparian habitat
• Low levels of pollutants
• Cool water

Maps:
US Geological Survey maps "Dublin" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Documents:

Stream Survey Eden Creek, J. T. Allen and R. Moore, Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, June 16, 1960.



HOLLIS CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Hollis Canyon Creek

GNIS identifier: 1682702 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth 37.6957637-122.0257947374145N1220133WHayward
Source37.7218736-121.9741264374319N1215827WDublin

General Characteristics:

• 2.77 square mile subwatershed. The creek flows southwest through Hollis Canyon to Eden Creek.
• Grassland and oak woodland used for grazing.
• Habitat for red-legged frog and possibly Alameda whipsnake.
• Historically the creek had Coho salmon and steelhead trout runs.

History:

Named for James Lyman Hollis, farmer and dairyman from Vermont, who settled in the canyon in 1853. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Highly erosive and a major source of silt to Don Castro Reservoir
• No fish due to barriers and intermittent flow
• Grazing practices
• Illegal dumping
• Non-native vegetation

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "Dublin" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Documents:



NORRIS CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Norris Canyon Creek

GNIS identifier: 229589 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.7315957-122.0335726374354N1220201WHayward
Source37.7538169-122.0163498374514N1220059WLas Trampas Ridge

General Characteristics:

• Northern neighbor of Eden Creek, the creek flows through Norris Canyon.
• Riparian corridor mostly native.
• Approximately 20 residents live in the subwatershed.

History:

Named for Leo Norris, farmer from Kentucky, who settled in the canyon in 1850. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues: several fish barriers, erosion and sedimentation, bank failures, illegal dumping.

• Several fish barriers
• Erosion and sedimentation
• Bank failures
• Illegal dumping

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "Las Trampas Ridge" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Documents:



PALOMARES CREEK

Alternative and historic names: None known

GNIS identifier: 230280 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth 37.6957637-122.0257947374145N1220133WHayward
Source37.6518764-121.9660707373907N1215758WDublin

General Characteristics:

• 9.2 sq mile basin; the creek flows northwest through Palomares Canyon to Eden Canyon.
• Oak woodland used for grazing, horse facilities, and rural residential development.
• Many diverse species of animals and fishes observed.
• Mostly native riparian corridor.

History:

Named for Francisco Palomares, a judge. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Illegal dumping
• Manure management
• Fish passage issue due to Don Castro Dam
• Landscape encroaching on the floodplain
• Erosion and sedimentation

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "Dublin" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Confluence of Palomares and San Lorenzo creeks

Palomares Creek Restoration (2001 - 2004)

Palomares Creek Restoration (2002)


Documents:

Stream Survey Palomares Creek, J. T. Allen, Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, June 18, 1960.

Decision on Application to Appropriate Unappropriated Water in Palomares Creek (March 18, 1976, Calif. Water Resources Board, Decision 1457).

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for Palomares Creek

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for Palomares Creek



UPPER SAN LORENZO CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Arroyo de la Harina

GNIS identifier: 232434 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates: (for entire course of the creek: upper, mid, and lower)

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.6702094-122.1627433374013N1220946WSan Leandro
Source37.6957637-122.0257947374145N1220133WHayward

General Characteristics:

• Healthiest segment of San Lorenzo Creek
• Don Castro Dam built in 1964 (380 acre-feet capacity) immediately downstream of the Palomares Creek confluence
• Stream channel is stable above Don Castro Reservoir
• Surrounding land is suburban in nature
• Deep pools with cool water temperatures

History:

Issues:

• Don Castro Dam and culvert under I580 are barriers to fish migration
• Sedimentation of Don Castro Dam
• Urban runoff
• Illegal dumping

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "San Leandro" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Don Castro Reservoir

Wetlands at Don Castro Reservoir


Documents:

Fishery Resources of Upper San Lorenzo Creek, Alameda County, memo from K. R. Anderson, Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, to S. DeSilva, and R. Houghtby, Warden, August 27, 1975.

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for San Lorenzo Creek above Don Castro Reservoir

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for San Lorenzo Creek above Don Castro Reservoir



MIDDLE SAN LORENZO CREEK WATERSHED
(Castro Valley, Chabot, Kelly Canyon, San Lorenzo, and Ward creeks)


CASTRO VALLEY CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Coyote Creek

GNIS identifier: 2124559 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth 37.6816667-122.0805556374054N1220450WHayward
Source37.7372222-122.0611111374414N1220340WHayward

General Characteristics:

• Flows from the hills through urbanized Castro Valley into San Lorenzo Creek.
• The lowest reach is natural before it meets Chabot Creek.

The Castro Valley Creek Watershed, a subwatershed of the San Lorenzo Creek drainage, covers 5.51 square miles in west central Alameda County. The population of the watershed is approximately 35,000. The area is predominantly low-density residential development (50%), with some open space (35%) and commercial development (15%).

There are 11,600 assessed parcels with single-family residential units and 3,200 with multiple family units within the watershed.

Mean annual rainfall in the watershed is about 21 inches, with over 95% occurring between October 1 and May 31. The soils are predominantly clays and silty clays. The elevation ranges from 200 to 500 feet (65 to 160 meters) above mean sea level.

Castro Valley Creek flows year round. Summertime flows average about 0.2 cubic feet per second (cfs). The peak flow of record was 1,550 cfs on February 2, 1998. The average annual flow for water years 1972 to 2004 was 123 million cubic feet.

Approximately 500 feet upstream of the confluence of Castro Valley Creek and San Lorenzo Creek, in the vicinity of the USGS stream gauging station, the channel is predominantly bedrock. Upstream from there the channels are predominantly incised or culverted.

(Source: Results of the 2003-2004 Castro Valley Creek Water Quality Monitoring Project, see below under Documents.)

History:

A portion of the creek, adjacent to the new Castro Valley Library, was daylighted in 2008 (see Castro Valley Creek Restoration).
Issues:

• Illicit discharges
• Non-native species
• Extensive channelization and undergrounding
• Pollution
• Illegal dumping

Maps:

US Geological Survey map "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Castro Valley Creek seen from bridge about 1/4 mi from intersection of Madison Ave. and Seaview (photo #1) (Photo 2012 by Roxann Lewis)

Castro Valley Creek seen from bridge about 1/4 mi from intersection of Madison Ave. and Seaview (photo #2) (Photo 2012 by Roxann Lewis)

Castro Valley Creek seen from bridge about 1/4 mi from intersection of Madison Ave. and Seaview (photo #3) (Photo 2012 by Roxann Lewis)

Castro Valley Creek alongside Madison Ave. (Photo 2012 by Roxann Lewis)

Restored portion of Castro Valley Creek upstream of the Castro Valley Library

Photo set (taken 2011) at flickr.com

Documents:

Madison Area Specific Plan covers a portion of the creek; adopted by the county board of supervisors, 1975, amended 2006. (See Alameda County General and Specific Plans.)

Relation of Urban Land-use and Land-surface Characteristics to Quantity and Quality of Storm Runoff in Two Basins in California [1974-75], Marc A. Sylvester and William M. Brown, 1978.

Urban Runoff Water Quality at Castro Valley Creek, Alameda County, California, November 1978-April 1979, Metcalf & Eddy, Inc. (Palo Alto), Sept. 1979.

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for Castro Valley Creek

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for Castro Valley Creek

Results of the 2003-2004 Castro Valley Creek Water Quality Monitoring Project, Alameda County Flood Control District, April 7, 2005 (link to PDF file)


CHABOT CREEK

Alternative and historic names: None known

GNIS identifier: n/a (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth
Source

General Characteristics

• Most urbanized creek.
• Natural along Carlos Bee Park.

History:

Named for Anthony Chabot, a native of Quebec and local resident, who was noted for building water systems in the Bay Area. See Wikipedia article.

Issues:

• Urban runoff
• High water temperatures
• Lack of wildlife connectivity
• Channelization and undergrounding
• Illegal dumping

Maps:

Images:

Documents:



KELLY CANYON CREEK

Alternative and historic names:

GNIS identifier: 2124560 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.7141667-122.0630556374251N1220347WHayward
Source37.7255556-122.0594444374332N1220334WHayward

General Characteristics:

• Follows Common Road and flows into Castro Valley Creek. It lies in the canyon west of Cull Canyon.

History:

Named for John Kelly, who owned 251 acres on the creek in 1878. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

Maps:

US Geological Survey map "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Documents:



SAN LORENZO CREEK

Alternative and historic names:

GNIS identifier: 232434 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates: (for entire creek: upper, mid, and lower)

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.6702094-122.1627433374013N1220946WSan Leandro
Source37.6957637-122.0257947374145N1220133WHayward

General Characteristics:

• Natural channel.
• Watershed highly urbanized.
• Don Castro Dam modified natural flows.
• Good riparian corridor - some non-natives.
• Deep pools, continuous flows.

History:

Haywards Weekly Journal, Sept. 25, 1880

Issues: warm water temperatures, many non-native plants & fish, homeless encampments, residential encroachment into riparian corridor, urban runoff, illegal dumping.

Maps:

US Geologic Survey maps "San Leandro" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Creek in downtown Hayward (JPG file, 186 kB, from Wikimedia Commons; photo taken Aug. 27, 2011)

Documents:

Stream Survey San Lorenzo Creek, R. Curtis and G. Scoppettone, Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, August 20, 1975.

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for San Lorenzo Creek at Hayward

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for San Lorenzo Creek at Hayward



WARD CREEK

Alternative and historic names: Sulphur Springs Creek (see History, below).

GNIS identifier: 235709 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates: (for entire creek: upper and lower)

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.6135448-122.0721850373649N1220420WNewark
Source37.6563209 -122.0124611373923N1220045WHayward

General Characteristics:

• 4 square mile urbanized drainage.
• Flow from Ward Creek watershed was diverted into San Lorenzo Creek (at 2nd Street in downtown Hayward) in 1962.
• Sulphur Creek Nature Center.
• Residential development around Ward Creek; residential and light industrial development around Sulphur Creek.

History:

Originally named Sulphur Springs Creek for a sulphur spring located in the canyon behind the Hayward Plunge. Ward Creek, the upper part of Sulphur Springs Creek, was named after the surveyor Charles T. Ward. The lower part of the creek, which flows to San Francisco Bay, is called Sulphur Creek. (Alameda County Place Names, Page Mosier and Dan Mosier, Fremont, CA: Mines Road Books, 1986.)

Issues:

• Urban runoff
• Lack of riparian vegetation
• Urban encroachment
• Fish migration barriers
• Illegal dumping
• Many underground culverts

Maps:

US Geological Survey maps "Newark" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Documents:



LOWER SAN LORENZO CREEK WATERSHED
(San Lorenzo Creek, Bockman Canal)


SAN LORENZO CREEK

Alternative and historic names:

GNIS identifier: 232434 (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates: (for entire course of creek: upper, mid, and lower)

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth37.6702094-122.1627433374013N1220946WSan Leandro
Source37.6957637-122.0257947374145N1220133WHayward

General Characteristics:

• Approximately 5 miles of natural creek below Foothill Blvd. was converted to concrete-lined channel by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1960s. (See "1954 Report to Congress" under Documents below.)
• Subwatershed is highly urbanized.

History:

Issues:

• High water velocities (lack of resting pools can create fish passage barrier)
• Lack of wildlife habitat
• High water temperatures
• Illegal dumping
• Urban stormwater runoff pollution
• Graffiti on concrete channel walls
• Mouth of creek has invasive Spartina (cordgrass)

Maps:

1857, U.S. Coast Survey

1858-1873, prepared by John La Croze, "Plat of the Rancho San Lorenzo." (U.S. Surveyor’s General Office, San Francisco, CA. Earth Sciences Library, 64362 32286 1863 L3, Case D, University of California, Berkeley.) 1873, prepared by State Geologist J.D. Whitney

1900, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey

US Geological Survey maps "San Leandro" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000), "Hayward" (7.5 minute, 1:24,000).

Images:

Pedestrian bridge between San Leandro (Vining Dr.) and San Lorenzo (via Barrett)

Mouth of San Lorenzo Creek

San Lorenzo Creek near the bay

Railroad over San Lorenzo Creek near the bay (source: www.railpictures.net)

Documents:

1954 Report to Congress on San Lorenzo Creek — This historic document set the stage for the concrete lining of San Lorenzo Creek below Foothill Boulevard. The report has a wealth of historical detail about the creek and discussion of flooding problems.

1998 California Hydrologic Data Report for San Lorenzo Creek at San Lorenzo

1999 California Hydrologic Data Report for San Lorenzo Creek at San Lorenzo



BOCKMAN CANAL

Alternative and historic names:

GNIS identifier: n/a (see Geographic Names Information System)

Geographic coordinates:

Latitude(DEC)Longitude(DEC)Latitude(DMS)Longitude(DMS)USGS Map
Mouth
Source

General Characteristics:

• 4 square mile urbanized basin (series of storm drains draining western San Lorenzo)
• Located south of San Lorenzo Creek in San Lorenzo
• Only one mile of open channel

History:

Issues:

• Urban runoff
• Lack of wildlife habitat
• Illegal dumping

Maps:

Images:

Bockman Canal bridge at bay shoreline

Documents:

Experimental levee at Bockman Canal (2015)



Sources: Some basic information from Alameda County Public Works Agency, Clean Water Program (as of May 2006)


[Updated March 25, 2015]